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The 2017 Top Programming Languages

November 4th, 2017 No comments

From: IEEE Spectrum
The 2017 Top Programming Languages
Python jumps to No. 1, and Swift enters the Top Ten
By Stephen Cass
Date: July 18, 2017

It’s summertime here at IEEE Spectrum, and that means it’s time for our fourth interactive ranking of the top programming languages. As with all attempts to rank the usage of different languages, we have to rely on various proxies for popularity. In our case, this means having data journalist Nick Diakopoulos mine and combine 12 metrics from 10 carefully chosen online sources to rank 48 languages. But where we really differ from other rankings is that our interactive allows you choose how those metrics are weighted when they are combined, letting you personalize the rankings to your needs.

We have a few preset weightings—a default setting that’s designed with the typical Spectrum reader in mind, as well as settings that emphasize emerging languages, what employers are looking for, and what’s hot in open source. You can also filter out industry sectors that don’t interest you or create a completely customized ranking and make a comparison with a previous year.

So what are the Top Ten Languages for the typical Spectrum reader?


[Click here to explore interactive rankings]

Python has continued its upward trajectory from last year and jumped two places to the No. 1 slot, though the top four—Python, C, Java, and C++—all remain very close in popularity. Indeed, in Diakopoulos’s analysis of what the underlying metrics have to say about the languages currently in demand by recruiting companies, C comes out ahead of Python by a good margin.

C# has reentered the top five, taking back the place it lost to R last year. Ruby has fallen all the way down to 12th position, but in doing so it has given Apple’s Swift the chance to join Google’s Go in the Top Ten. This is impressive, as Swift debuted on the rankings just two years ago. (Outside the Top Ten, Apple’s Objective-C mirrors the ascent of Swift, dropping down to 26th place.)

However, for the second year in a row, no new languages have entered the rankings. We seem to have entered a period of consolidation in coding as programmers digest the tools created to cater to the explosion of cloud, mobile, and big data applications.

Speaking of stabilized programming tools and languages, it’s worth noting Fortran’s continued presence right in the middle of the rankings (sitting still in 28th place), along with Lisp in 35th place and Cobol hanging in at 40th: Clearly even languages that are decades old can still have sustained levels of interest. (And although it just barely clears the threshold for inclusion in our rankings, I’m pleased to see that my personal favorite veteran language—Forth—is still there in 47th place).

Looking at the preset weighting option for open source projects, where we might expect a bias toward newer projects versus decades-old legacy systems, we see that HTML has entered the Top Ten there, rising from 11th place to 8th. (This is a great moment for us to reiterate our response to the complaint of some in years past of “HTML isn’t a programming language, it’s just markup.” At Spectrum, we have a very pragmatic view about what is, and isn’t, a recognizable programming language. HTML is used by coders to instruct computers to do things, so we include it. We don’t insist on, for example, Turing completeness as a threshold for inclusion—and to get really nitpicky, as user Jonny Lin pointed out last year, HTML has grown so complex that when combined with CSS, it is now Turing complete, albeit with a little prodding and requiring an appreciation of cellular automata.)

Finally, one last technical detail: We’ve made some tweaks under the hood to improve the robustness of the results, especially for less popular languages where the signals in the metrics are weaker and so more prone to statistical noise. So that users who look at historical data can make consistent comparisons, we’ve recalculated the previous year’s rankings with the new system. This could lead to some discrepancies between a language’s ranking in a given year as currently shown, versus the ranking that was shown in the original year of publication, but such differences should be relatively small and not affect the more popular languages in any case.

Categories: Computing, IEEE, Teaching Technology Tags:

Neat way to learn Robotics

September 29th, 2017 No comments

From: https://www.roboterra.com/

Origin™ Robotics Kit & CastleRock

Looking for a fun and easy way to introduce STEM in your classroom? Our Origin Robotics Kit enables anyone to build real robots and program them. The kit includes metal parts, servos, LEDs and sensors, so kids can create robots that react to the environment around them.

Origin Robotics Kit includes access to our CastleRock programming software. Using CastleRock, kids will learn to code while they construct robots that spin, wave arms and flash LEDs. Students use C++ coding language to control their robots, providing a solid foundation to easily explore other languages and skills. Going beyond programming, CastleRock provides a set of tiered challenges that guides students through a planned, conversational curriculum. No previous technology experience is required!

Robotic program helps students build STEM skills

September 11th, 2017 No comments

From: KPLC
Tuesday, September 5th 2017, 6:20 pm CDT
By Jolina Okazaki, Multimedia Journalis

KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

MIDLAND, TX (KWES) –
A STEM robotics program at Lee High School is allowing students to put their engineering skills to good use.

“It takes brainpower, you can’t just come up with it out of nowhere,” said Cristian Valeriano.

It brings science, math and technology to the next level.

“The nice thing about it is you step back and help them if they need help,” said Alan Pitkin, Career and Technical Education Teacher of STEM Robotics. “You want them to use their brain to think and problem solve. Say, ‘Hey Google something, see how something works, see how the real world is using it and implement it in your robot.”

Building a robot isn’t as easy as it looks. It takes brainstorming, teamwork, problem-solving, executing and trial-and-error.

“Building takes a lot of precision,” said Christian Martinez. “It’s really key to this. One small mishap can ruin the whole thing. Building takes a lot of hours. After school, we come, on weekends and in the summer.”

“When we first got started, it was grasping an idea,” said Valeriano. “First, it’s where to start. We make the wheels and build off from there. We need to pick up a ball, we need something to pick up a ball. It’s piece by piece.”

Every year, students in the program learn and prepare for a robotics competition towards the end of the year called First Robotics. It’s one of the biggest competitions where teams build robots and compete against each other and win scholarships. But it doesn’t come cheap and only a small portion of school funds are used with help from the MISD Education Foundation.

“When you have to go to regionals, like Georgia, it’s $12,000 to $15,000,” said Pitkin. “Houston is $5,000. It also depends on how many kids you take. Some of these kids haven’t been out of Midland. I give them the experience and see what the world is doing. Midland isn’t that far out and Midland can compete with anybody.”

The program has become successful thanks to the Midland Independent School District Education Foundation and its sponsors from SM Energy, the J Robert Jones Charitable Trust Foundation and Pioneer.

“They see a value in giving your money to the school for robotics,” said Pitkin. “It’s all being put to good use.”

But these funds are what get the gears turning for these students to become successful and inspire the next generation of engineers.

“It’s beneficial to learn now then get put out in the world and not know what to do,” said Valeriano.

“I want to go to A&M, which has a good engineering program as far as architecture,” said Martinez. “I feel like this will help me get there and achieve it.”

To help and sponsor the program, you can contact Jami Owen with the MISD Education Foundation here.

There will be a Phillip Phillips concert that will benefit the MISD Education Foundation this Saturday, Sept. 9, 8:00 p.m. at the Midland County Horseshoe Amphitheater.

Categories: Robot News, Teaching Technology Tags:

Turing Tumble: Gaming on a Mechanical Computer by Paul Boswell — Kickstarter

June 3rd, 2017 No comments
Categories: Computing, IEEE, Teaching Technology Tags:

State Progress on K-12 Computer Science Ed Policies: ‘We Have a Long Way to Go’

April 24th, 2017 No comments
Categories: Computing, Teaching Technology Tags:

How to Make Hydraulic Powered Robotic Arm from Cardboard – NTD Inspired

March 24th, 2017 No comments

America’s High School Graduates Look Like Other Countries’ High School Dropouts

March 17th, 2016 No comments

Ed Note: I felt I had to post this as an educator……

From: nprED
Date: March 14, 2016

A new study confirms what many Americans already knew deep in their hearts: We’re not good at math.

Not only that, but when it comes to technology skills, we’re dead last compared with other developed countries.

The PIAAC study — the Program for International Assessment of Adult Competencies — looks at the skills adults need to do everyday tasks, whether it’s at work or in their social lives.

“Clearly, we have some work to do in this country,” says Peggy Carr, the acting commissioner of the government’s National Center for Education Statistics. The study compared countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Read more…

Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

Collierville HS Wins VEX State Championship

March 11th, 2016 No comments

Congratulations to the Collierville VEX Robotics Team who won the TN State Championship on Saturday in Nashville. The robot named “The Illuminati” was crowned Tournament Champion and will advance to the VEX Robotics World Championship in Louisville, KY April 20-23. The Illuminati team also received the Sportsmanship award, voted on by the other tournament teams and Shelli Brasher (their coach) received the award for TN VEX Partner of the Year for establishing VEX robotics in West TN.

robots-IMG_6136

The Collierville team is looking for sponsors to help offset transportation, hotel and meals costs. Contact Shelli Brasher at (sbrasher@colliervilleschools.org) if you are interested in helping sponsor the team at the world competition.

Related items:

TVA Cheers on Valley Robotics Team Heading to World Championship

Fox13 News

5 Robots Seeking Your Crowdfunding Support

February 27th, 2016 No comments

From Robotics Trends


Kamibot Programmable Robot for Kids
Kamibot is a programmable papercraft robot for kids that can be customized with code and colorful skins. Kamibot is built around the open-source Arduino platform, so kids can easily learn how to code using Scratch, a drag-and-drop programming language.

Kamibot has raised $19,115 of its $50,000 goal on Kickstarter.


CoDrone Programmable Drone
CoDrone is a quadcopter that you can be programmed to do almost anything you want using step-by-step videos. You can program CoDrone to follow you, engage in laser battles, go through a maze and much more. It has raised $175,923 with an original goal of $50,000 on Kickstarter.


Xibot Robot Assistant
XIBOT can act as a personal assistant in our lives, helping with e-mails, messages, phone calls, shopping lists and other everyday tasks. With Wi-Fi connected to Xibot, you can monitor your house anywhere and anytime. Xibot has raised $28,150 on Indiegogo with an original goal of $10,000.


Rook Flying Home Assistant Drone
Rook claims to be the world’s first home drone that you can fly from anywhere in the world. By connecting to the Internet, Rook allows you to control and view the camera stream from your phone in real-time. Just connect Rook to your home Wi-Fi network, and use it as a platform for different needs in your life:

– Flying security camera – Family/pet monitor – Video tour of your home – Check to see if you turned the stove off

Rook has raised $40,227 on Indiegogo with an original goal of $20,000.


SumoBoy Robotics Kit
SumoBoy is a multipurpose Arduino-based robotics kit for sport and education. The goal of SumoBoy is to Kickstart hundreds of new sumo-robot communities all around the world. To push the competition to the next level by introducing new crowds to the scene of robotics.

SumoBoy has raised $7,090 of its $100,000 goal.

ZeroUI Inc

January 13th, 2016 No comments

From Robotic Trends
By Eugene Demaitre
January 12, 2016

ZeroUI Inc. has developed a set of four motor modules with a gesture-based controller glove for an intuitive user interface. With Ziro, makers can control wheels and direction or arms on homemade robots.

Ziro’s modules can be used to wirelessly move and control robots made from materials including cardboard, wood or metal, allowing for creative development. The kit will be funded by an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign and costs $199.