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Archive for the ‘Teaching Technology’ Category

Purdue Now Offers Graduate Certificate For Current And Prospective STEM Faculty

June 5th, 2019 No comments

Purdue’s School of Engineering Education (ENE), the first of its kind, is offering an online 10-credit hour graduate certificate in Teaching and Learning in Engineering. ENE has teamed with Purdue Online to offer this unique certificate program for current or prospective faculty members in STEM fields. Courses include Engineering Education Methods and Content, Assessment and Pedagogy. For more information and to apply, visit Purdue’s Teaching and Learning in Engineering page.

Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

How Servo Motors Work?

June 4th, 2019 No comments

From: Jameco Electronics

Servo Motor Controllers

This little motor is high in efficiency and power

Servo motors have been around for a long time and are utilized in many applications. They are small in size but pack a big punch and are very energy-efficient. These features allow them to be used to operate remote-controlled or radio-controlled toy cars, robots and airplanes. Servo motors are also used in industrial applications, robotics, in-line manufacturing, pharmaceutics and food services. But how do the little guys work?

The servo circuitry is built right inside the motor unit and has a positionable shaft, which usually is fitted with a gear (as shown below). The motor is controlled with an electric signal which determines the amount of movement of the shaft.

What’s inside the servo?

To fully understand how the servo works, you need to take a look under the hood. Inside there is a pretty simple set-up: a small DC motor, potentiometer, and a control circuit. The motor is attached by gears to the control wheel. As the motor rotates, the potentiometer’s resistance changes, so the control circuit can precisely regulate how much movement there is and in which direction.

When the shaft of the motor is at the desired position, power supplied to the motor is stopped. If not, the motor is turned in the appropriate direction. The desired position is sent via electrical pulses through the signal wire. The motor’s speed is proportional to the difference between its actual position and desired position. So if the motor is near the desired position, it will turn slowly, otherwise it will turn fast. This is called proportional control. This means the motor will only run as hard as necessary to accomplish the task at hand, a very efficient little guy.

How is the servo controlled?

Servos are controlled by sending an electrical pulse of variable width, or pulse width modulation (PWM), through the control wire. There is a minimum pulse, a maximum pulse, and a repetition rate. A servo motor can usually only turn 90° in either direction for a total of 180° movement. The motor’s neutral position is defined as the position where the servo has the same amount of potential rotation in the both the clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. The PWM sent to the motor determines position of the shaft, and based on the duration of the pulse sent via the control wire; the rotor will turn to the desired position. The servo motor expects to see a pulse every 20 milliseconds (ms) and the length of the pulse will determine how far the motor turns. For example, a 1.5ms pulse will make the motor turn to the 90° position. Shorter than 1.5ms moves it in the counter clockwise direction toward the 0° position, and any longer than 1.5ms will turn the servo in a clockwise direction toward the 180° position.

When these servos are commanded to move, they will move to the position and hold that position. If an external force pushes against the servo while the servo is holding a position, the servo will resist from moving out of that position. The maximum amount of force the servo can exert is called the torque rating of the servo. Servos will not hold their position forever though; the position pulse must be repeated to instruct the servo to stay in position.

Types of Servo Motors

There are two types of servo motors – AC and DC. AC servo can handle higher current surges and tend to be used in industrial machinery. DC servos are not designed for high current surges and are usually better suited for smaller applications. Generally speaking, DC motors are less expensive than their AC counterparts. These are also servo motors that have been built specifically for continuous rotation, making it an easy way to get your robot moving. They feature two ball bearings on the output shaft for reduced friction and easy access to the rest-point adjustment potentiometer.

Servo Motor Applications

Servos are used in radio-controlled airplanes to position control surfaces like elevators, rudders, walking a robot, or operating grippers. Servo motors are small, have built-in control circuitry and have good power for their size.

In food services and pharmaceuticals, the tools are designed to be used in harsher environments, where the potential for corrosion is high due to being washed at high pressures and temperatures repeatedly to maintain strict hygiene standards. Servos are also used in in-line manufacturing, where high repetition yet precise work is necessary.

Of course, you don’t have to know how a servo works to use one, but as with most electronics, the more you understand, the more doors open for expanded projects and projects’ capabilities. Whether you’re a hobbyist building robots, an engineer designing industrial systems, or just constantly curious, where will servo motors take you?

Servo Motor Buyer Guide


Categories: Robot Parts, Teaching Technology Tags:

Is There a Mismatch Between Career-Tech Ed and Good Jobs?

April 16th, 2019 No comments
Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

EverFi

February 27th, 2019 No comments

Was told about an online resource for teachers that includes STEM Exploration. It can be found at https://everfi.com/offerings/stem-career-readiness/. I have not tried it myself, but thought I would pass it along.

Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

Gov. Bill Lee proposes $4M for STEM education, creation of K-8 computer science standards

February 25th, 2019 No comments

Jason Gonzales, Nashville Tennessean

Published 5:22 p.m. CT Feb. 13, 2019

Gov. Bill Lee is prioritizing STEM education in his legislative agenda, which proposes to boost opportunities for students statewide, including the creation of statewide K-8 computer science standards.

The Wednesday announcement is Lee’s second education initiative tied to his legislative priorities and would create the Future Workforce Initiative focused on science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Lee is proposing $4 million to create the initiative. The proposal must be approved by the Tennessee General Assembly.

“Our agenda advocates for increased access to career and technical education for K-12 students and a key part of this includes prioritizing STEM training,” Lee said in the news release about the announcement. “The Future Workforce Initiative is a direct response to the emerging technology industry and making sure our students are first in line to be qualified for technology jobs.”

Lee’s proposal aims to place Tennessee in the top 25 states for job creation in the science, technology, engineering and math sector by 2022.

Lee’s proposal will focus on three areas. They are:

  • Launching 100 new middle school programs in STEM fields. Lee wants to triple the number of STEM-designated public schools by 2022.
  • Growing the number of teachers qualified to teach work-based learning and advanced computer science courses through training and the creation of K-8 computer science standards.
  • Expanding postsecondary STEM opportunities in high school through increased access to dual credit, AP courses and dual enrollment.

Lee said in the release that 58 percent of all STEM jobs created in the country are in computer science fields, but only 8 percent of graduates study computer science in college.

“By exposing Tennessee students to computer science in their K-12 careers we are ensuring our kids have every chance to land a high-quality job,” Lee said.

Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

STEM Instruction: How Much There Is and Who Gets It

February 21st, 2019 No comments

from: Education Week

by Sasha Jones

Jan8, 2019

Despite a push for greater STEM instruction, students and teachers continue to experience inequitable access to STEM-related classes and resources, according to a new survey of 1,200 schools and 7,600 teachers.

This nationally representative study is the sixth in a series of surveys on K-12 STEM education and college and career readiness dating back to 1977, but the first to put an emphasis on computer science and engineering. The survey, conducted by Horizon Reasearch, Inc. and commissioned by the National Science Foundation, covered a variety of topics relevant to teachers, giving insights into instructional practices, course offerings, resources, and professional development participation in K-12 math, science, and computer science.

Read more…
Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

Vocational Education (GIVE) Initiative

February 19th, 2019 No comments

From: tn.gov Website
Date: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 | 10:22am

Gov. Bill Lee Announces the Governor’s Investment in Vocational Education (GIVE) Initiative builds public-private partnerships and doubles dual enrollment offerings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Today, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee announced his first legislative initiative, the Governor’s Investment in Vocational Education (GIVE) to expand access to vocational and technical training for Tennessee students. 

“I believe that expanding our vocational and technical offerings will be transformational for Tennesseans and the future of our state,” said Lee. “We have the opportunity to help students discover quality career paths and gain skills that are needed right now in the workforce by emphasizing career and technical education.”

The GIVE initiative is a two-pronged approach that utilizes regional partnerships to develop work-based learning and apprenticeship opportunities. Communities will now have the funding and flexibility to build programs that best reflect local needs and work directly with private industry to structure programming. 

GIVE also provides funding for high school juniors and seniors to utilize four, fully-funded dual enrollment credits for trade and technical programs. Previously, high school students only had access to two fully-funded dual enrollment credits. With access to four credits, students will now be better prepared for entry into the workforce within two years of graduation.

“With GIVE, there is now a framework in place to partner with the private sector in addressing gaps in our workforce,” said Lee. “This initiative also puts students in charge of their future by preparing them for a good job right out of high school.”

Two grant programs will fund the initiative: GIVE Community Grants and GIVE Student Grants. Using the framework of the state’s Labor Education Alignment Program (LEAP), the governor will recommend new funding in support of work-based learning through GIVE Community Grants. These competitive grants will go to regional partnerships between TCATs, industry, and K-12 to build new programs in work-based learning and apprenticeships, market-driven dual-credit opportunities, and the expansion of industry-informed CTE offerings at local high schools.

GIVE Student Grants will be funded via the Tennessee Lottery and support expanded access to dual enrollment.

“It is time to make sure education in Tennessee embraces multiple pathways to success,” said Lee. “We believe GIVE is a key step for the future of our kids and ensuring we can fill the jobs of tomorrow.” 

Categories: Teaching Technology Tags:

Try Engineering

February 18th, 2019 No comments

The TryEngineering.org website has been around for years, but it has been recently updated. Check it out HERE.

Categories: IEEE, Teaching Technology Tags:

Robotics Curriculum

February 10th, 2019 No comments

Siemens Curriculum on Robotic Mechanisms and  Mechanical Design:

http://www.robotmechanisms.com/

STEM Instruction: How Much There Is and Who Gets It

February 5th, 2019 No comments

From: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2019/01/survey_gives_new_insights_into.html

By Sasha Jones on January 8, 2019 3:55 PM

Despite a push for greater STEM instruction, students and teachers continue to experience inequitable access to STEM-related classes and resources, according to a new survey of 1,200 schools and 7,600 teachers.

This nationally representative study is the sixth in a series of surveys on K-12 STEM education and college and career readiness dating back to 1977, but the first to put an emphasis on computer science and engineering. The survey, conducted by Horizon Reasearch, Inc. and commissioned by the National Science Foundation, covered a variety of topics relevant to teachers, giving insights into instructional practices, course offerings, resources, and professional development participation in K-12 math, science, and computer science.

Read more…
Categories: Computing, Teaching Technology Tags: