Robot Octopus Points the Way to Soft Robotics With Eight Wiggly Arms – IEEE Spectrum

August 25th, 2016 No comments
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LattePanda | A Palm-sized Computer Running Win10 With Build-in Arduino

August 21st, 2016 No comments
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Article: The Megaprocessor is an awe-inspiring multi-ton CPU project

August 19th, 2016 No comments

The Megaprocessor is an awe-inspiring multi-ton CPU project

http://flip.it/rQaT_J

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Evanoff: Memphis’ newest tech firm gets around skills shortage

August 17th, 2016 No comments
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spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/semiconductors/optoelectronics/mit-lidar-on-a-chip/?utm_source=CarsThatThink&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_campaign=CTT08172016

August 17th, 2016 No comments
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Boston Dynamics’ SpotMini Is All Electric, Agile, and Has a Capable Face-Arm – IEEE Spectrum

August 12th, 2016 No comments
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Robotic Summer Camps

May 26th, 2016 No comments

Looking for a robotics camp for your kids in Memphis. Here is the list of the one’s I know about:

Cloud 901 at the public library is hosting a few camps for kids interested in robotics and programing. To see the list of camps CLICK HERE

University of Memphis Herff College is hosting its Girls Experiencing Engineering camp which will be focused on robotics this year. See THIS LINK for more details.

Collierville Robotics is hosting two VEX Robotics camps. For more info see THIS WEBSITE

I will add more as I find out about them. If you know of a robotics camp, please let me know so I can post them here….email them to dkohn96@gmail.com.

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My Maker Faires are so Important for Our Kids

May 26th, 2016 No comments

From: Time Magazine
By: Tim Bajarin
May 23, 2016

They help interest children in the fields of the future

This weekend, I hopped on a train for my annual trek to Maker Faire, held this year at the San Mateo Events Center. Over 150,000 people attended this year’s show, coming to check out new drones, 3D printers, robots and more.

This particular event is the granddaddy of Maker Faires, started by Maker Media and its visionary founder Dale Dougherty. It bills itself as the greatest “Show and Tell on Earth.” (There’s a National Faire in Washington, D.C., a New York event, and global Faires in France, Germany, Tokyo and more.)

I’ve long been following the Maker Movement as a part of my overall interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. These shows have become increasingly important as a means to introduce kids to these fields. At Maker Faires, children get hands-on experience with electronic gadgets, from programming to soldering. Kids can play with robotic kits, try building a drone and generally tinker with all sorts of gizmos.

Maker Faires typically feature dozens of speakers from the technology world who share details about what they’re doing and how it relates to the Maker Movement. As one walks around these shows, you see kids excited to learn about technology and making things. This year’s show also included booths from major sponsors like Intel, Google, Microsoft and more.

One new exhibitor at this year’s Bay Area event was the Department of Energy, who wanted to give kids the chance to interact with its scientists and to try to get them involved in the future of energy. “Kids are untapped resources that will help deal with climate change, energy issues and the environment,” said Jetta Wong, director of the DoE’s Office of Technology Transition. (U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz recently blogged about the subject.)

Still, one concern of mine about the Bay Area Maker Faire is that very few minorities attend this show. This is not the fault of the folks who manage the Maker Faire, as they work extremely hard to make this event inclusive. In fact, on Friday, the first day of the show, they and sponsors LinkedIn, RoboTerra and ThinkLogix brought over 4,000 students from underserved communities to the show to see demos and play with the various projects. However, this underscores the fact that the tech community as a whole has to work harder to get kids of all genders, races and ethnicity interested in STEM, as these scientific disciplines will open up new opportunities for them in the future.

The Maker Faires’ true importance lies in its focus on getting kids interested in making things. Over the last few years, I have written multiple pieces on STEM focusing on how companies around the world are backing STEM-based programs. All of them see how important these disciplines will be in the future. Still more germane to them is the real concern that if we cannot get kids trained in the sciences, we will not have the engineers and scientists to run our companies in the future.

Indeed, just about every business is having to rely more and more on the role technology plays in their world. The need to get this generation of students interested in STEM and tech has become a priority for companies, educators and parents. To that end, these Maker Faires, along with the tireless efforts of teachers, educators and companies rallying around STEM, can plant seeds of interest and help cultivate these future scientists and engineers. If they are successful they will create the next generation of leaders who will guide and power the businesses, schools and homes of tomorrow.


Tim Bajarin is recognized as one of the leading industry consultants, analysts and futurists, covering the field of personal computers and consumer technology. Mr. Bajarin is the President of Creative Strategies, Inc and has been with the company since 1981 where he has served as a consultant providing analysis to most of the leading hardware and software vendors in the industry

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Students Compete In Louisiana Underwater Robot Competition

May 23rd, 2016 No comments

The Baton Rouge (LA) Advocate (5/21, Richards) reported that the “US Navy National SeaPerch Challenge pitted teams of middle and high school students against each other” as they “raced handmade underwater robot-like contraptions…during a competition Saturday at the LSU Natatorium.” The Advocate says that 536 boys and 273 girls took part, “in line with national trends, where women fill 25 percent of science, technology, engineering and mathematics jobs.” Assistant Professor at LSU and director of the Gulf Coast Regional SeaPerch Challenge Bridgette Davis “said the real world application is critical for STEM education in Louisiana, given that much of the state’s economy involves being on or around water.” Executive Director of the SeaPerch Program Susan Nelson said, “We (graduate) less than 70,000 engineers in a year, so there aren’t enough people to fill the pipeline. … (The Navy) likes programs like this because of that reason.”

Ed Note: From Memphis: The Robochiefs from Craigmont High School Ranked 62 overall, 69th in the Obstacle Course 51st in the Challenge Results and 39th in the Poster! Congratulations!

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National Robotics League – Building America’s technology leaders, one robot at a time

May 23rd, 2016 No comments

I am not a big fan of “Battle Bots” but I am in favor of anything that gets kids excited about Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). The National Robotics League (http://gonrl.org/) looks to be a battle bots event for High School Kids started by the National Tooling and Machining Association.

I don’t like the fact that the bot is destroyed as part of the competition, but if an interest in STEM lasts, then it is worth it!

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