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Nissan Embeds Self-Parking Tech in Pillows and Slippers

February 14th, 2018

I never knew how badly I needed a self-parking slipper until now!
By Evan Ackerman
from IEEE Specturm

Nissan, like every other car manufacturer that doesn’t want to be rendered mostly obsolete within the next few decades, has been gradually developing autonomous technology for its vehicles. They’ve been going about it very sensibly, introducing discrete modules like highway assist and parking assist, and they’ve managed to get the parking bit working well enough to take it beyond cars. One such attempt at an even more challenging and important self-parking application: slipper arrangements.

At first glance, the ProPILOT Park Ryokan looks like any other traditional Japanese inn, or ryokan. Slippers are neatly lined up at the foyer, where guests remove their shoes. Tatami rooms are furnished with low tables and floor cushions for sitting. What sets this ryokan apart is that the slippers, tables and cushions are rigged with a special version of Nissan’s ProPILOT Park autonomous parking technology. When not in use, they automatically return to their designated spots at the push of a button.

Even the television remote is self parking! Brilliant!

For its primary application, Nissan’s ProPILOT Park system uses an array of four cameras and twelve sonar sensors to wedge its host vehicle into even the smallest of parking spaces—whether it’s nose-in parking, butt-in parking, or trickiest of all, parallel parking. It seems unlikely that the slippers use quite the same technology, although Nissan does suggest that the technology is at least similar, which would mean that the slippers are operating autonomously rather than relying on someone off-camera with a remote control. If you’d like to investigate further, Nissan is offering a free night for a pair of travelers at this particular ryokan, which located in Hakone, Japan—a lovely place that you should consider visiting even if self-parking slippers aren’t on the amenities list.

Our only question now is, why limit this technology to cars, slippers, and pillows? I’d like my cereal bowls to be self parking. And my socks. And how about the toothpaste? Just think about how much more convenient it would be if all of these things were self-parking, too. So let’s get going with this, Nissan. Make our lives better already.

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